Архів категорії: costumes

Raffaella Carrà – Italian style icon

Dress by Raffaella Carrà

The Italian actress, singer, dancer and TV host died at 78 last month. Born in Bologna in 1943, Raffaella Maria Roberta Pelloni, known as Raffaella Carrà, studied dance and acting, starring first in a few peplum films and appearing in Mark Robson’s “Von Ryan’s Express” (1965).

“Von Ryan’s Express” (1965)

Later she became more famous as a singer, dancer and co-host of programmes on Italy’s state TV Rai. Her songs, dance, music numbers and outfits made history for inspiring freedom, empowering women. At the end of the 1970s Raffaella became very popular in Spain and Latin America. Televisión Española hired her to conduct the live show “Hola Raffaella” between 1992 and 1993. In 2018, the king of Spain made her a dame, “al orden del mérito civil”, for being “an icon of freedom”. Her blonde bob and costumes became her signatures. Raffella Carrà’s myth developed with her wardrobe, created by costume designers who were loyal to her throughout her career – Corrado Colabucci, Luca Sabatelli and Gabriele Mayer. 

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Raffaella Carrà

Roberto Capucci for theatre

In 2018 legendary Roman designer Roberto Capucci shares his extraordinary vision in an exhibition of imaginary male dancers.

The drawings of Roberto Capucci are a sensational surprise from the quiet designer, who first took his architectural outfits from Rome to Florence and in the 1960s had a Paris atelier near Coco Chanel. Since the new millennium, he has concentrated on compelling male drawings focused on ballet. They form an exhibition, “Dionysian Capucci: Theatre Designs”, at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence.

Compared to the spare, architectural tailoring worn in the past by glamorous clients including Marilyn Monroe and Maria Callas, these are fantasies soaring into flight. The colours alone are painterly mixes of plum with orange, shocking pink and yellow, green, purple, blue, orange and red. That conjunction of shades is within a single outfit – if that is the word to describe fabric coiled in exotic swathes around hips and thighs. Capucci explains that he did not really focus on Dionysius and his metamorphoses, but that his drawings are more of a development of what he has created since his childhood.

“When I draw, I think of the future,” Capucci says. “There are transgressive costumes, with geometric exactness. And when I think of fashion, I think of art without adjectives.”

Text from Vogue.

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Fashion in costumes of Soviet perestroika cinema

Melnyk M. Fashion in costumes of Soviet perestroika cinema // Nefiltravanae Kino: Proceeding of the film studies conference (Minsk, March 13, 2020). – Minsk: 2020. – P. 28-31.

Abstract. Today, the fashion of the perestroika period is again in trend. Collections and museum exhibitions are dedicated to it. The time distance allows us to look at the culture of perestroika more objectively. In the wake of the search for truth, the costume in the perestroika movie reflected the fashion of the time without censorship and embellishment, so films of that time are an important source of scientific research. This article offers an analysis of the costumes of the most popular and stylistically interesting films, including “Courier”, “ASSA”, “Eagle”,  “Crash – Cop’s Daughter”, “Criminal talent” and “Interdevochka”. As a result of the analysis, the directions in the perestroika fashion are highlighted.

Keywords: perestroika fashion, soviet fashion, soviet cinema, cinema costume, fashion history, 1980s fashion.

The fashion of the Soviet perestroika is again relevant: collections of this style are shown on catwalks, costume exhibitions are held in museums. Perestroika, which officially began in 1985, refuted the official collections of Soviet state model houses, and the cinema of that time reflected not only how people dressed, but also how they perceived clothes, how they created their own fashionable images.

Among the scientific research of the declared topic are works by Jukka Gronow and Sergey Zhuravlev (Fashion Meets Socialism: Fashion Industry in the Soviet Union after the Second World War) [3], Karina Karaeva, dedicated to visual features of sots art in interaction with the visual language of Soviet cinema [1] and Ludmila Yatina, who studied the reflection of the lifestyle of young people іmage in Russian cinema [2]. In 2019 the book “Ruptures and Continuities in Soviet/Russian Cinema: Styles, characters and genres before and after the collapse of the USSR” was published [4].

Perestroika abolished the main function of Soviet cinema: to serve the current ideological order of the state. This led to the loss of landmarks and even the loss of the “hero” but allowed filmmakers to show life without any embellishment. That is why perestroika cinema is stylistically very interesting and shows a truthful fixation of that time fashion.

Cinema, which was created in the harsh conditions of the social consequences of the Soviet Union, did not aim to educate the younger generation but reproduced the surrounding reality of temptations, problems, and difficulties, a crisis of values, lack of orientations and priorities.

At a time when old norms were being destroyed, young people sought to form their own contradictory views. The voice of the younger generation sounded louder, and films about youth problems became harbingers of future changes, emphasizing not just the revolt of generations, but the deep gap between parents and children.

Karen Shakhnazarov’s film “Courier” (1986)

Karen Shakhnazarov’s film “Courier” (1986) became a kind of Manifesto for the youth of that time. The film showed close and understandable characters. From the point of the costume view, this is a kind of mirror of the late USSR. The film begins with a scene of divorce, immediately after which the new wife of the main character’s father appears in a fashionable white suit with wide shoulders and a bright print, dressed over a red shirt – this is the new phase of the characters ‘ life. The main female character of the film is remembered in the fashionable and scarce “Adidas” tracksuit, which was a real marker of “coolness” in the years when not only branded, but just any things of foreign production were an indicator of the special status. Her image as a Professor’s daughter embodies the privilege of the top of old Soviet society. “The lower classes” lived differently: “I have a dream to buy a coat” – says one of the characters at the end of the film, summing up the sad reality of perestroika and voicing the dreams of many teenagers of that time.

In Sergey Solovyov’s film “ASSA” (1987), ethics and aesthetics are even tougher. This film, about the relationship between the girlfriend of a crime boss and a musician she meets by chance, became a symbol of Gorbachev’s perestroika. The characters are dressed in baggy trench coats, voluminous pantsuits, shapeless jackets, and shirts layered one on top of the other. Today, these are already familiar images, but in 1987 this style of a young girl’s clothing was interpreted as a revolt against fashion: against bright colors, mini-skirts, plastic jewelry, high-combed hair, and permanent curls. This is a revolt not only against the old Soviet Union but also against the depraved social system as a whole. The film created an anti-fashion, embodied in things without gender, age, seasons and trends, beyond the bounds of decency and good taste. A kind of anthem of this riot, as well as the entire era of perestroika, was the song of the band “Kino”, which sounds at the end of the film – “Changes are required by our hearts”.

The frontman of “Kino” Viktor Tsoi

The frontman of “Kino” Viktor Tsoi was an idol of young people; his image was imitated, so when, after “ASSA”, Rashid Nugmanov’s “Needle” (1988) appeared on the screens, this picture became a cult one. This is one of the first Soviet films that truly spoke about the young generation of the USSR in its language. Tsoi did not design his character’s style specifically, but only dressed as he did off-screen. The singer’s trademark was total black: a loose leather jacket or bomber jacket, a t-shirt and trousers rolled up from the bottom – all this is a kind of anti-fashion that periodically becomes mainstream.

Anti-fashion, but more provocative images are also shown in the film “Crash – Cop’s Daughter” (1989) by Mikhail Tumanishvili.  Already at the beginning of the film, the father calls his fashionably dressed daughter a garden Scarecrow, demanding to remove her metal accessories. The daughter, like the rest of her company, has no authority and openly despises her elders, who before perestroika lied and hushed up the lawlessness in the USSR. Her enterprising grandfather getting “deficit” through the Union of war veterans. Crash teases him, challenging: “And can you get me some sneakers?”. The image of the Crash included a leather jacket and ripped jeans combined with high-combed hair and makeup in the style of “vamp” were very popular.

“Crash – Cop’s Daughter” (1989) by Mikhail Tumanishvili

Not much rebellious, but revealing were the films about prostitutes – absolutely new to the Soviet screen heroines: “Criminal talent” (1988) and “Interdevochka” (1989).

“Criminal talent” by Sergei Ashkenazi depicts a cheater who, after coming to study in a big city, instead of training at a cloth factory, is engaged in prostitution and theft. A beautiful and fashionably dressed blonde cynically criticizes the injustice of the existing system, in which to buy boots, you need to starve, and “Chanel sprayed, Dior dressed” sounds as absurd as to introduce yourself as Claudia Cardinale.

“Criminal talent” by Sergei Ashkenazi (1988)

Even more revealing of the rotten Soviet system is a parallel fashion story: the sixteen-year-old daughter of an investigator demands money from her father for expensive jeans from “Berezka”, which can only be bought with “connections” and paying double price, and for which an honest person does not have enough salary.

Pyotr Todorovskiy’s “Interdevochka” (1989)

Pyotr Todorovskiy’s “Interdevochka” (Intergirl) is one of the most popular films of the perestroika period and the leader of the Soviet film distribution in 1989. The film has received numerous awards and prizes. The main character of the film together with her “colleagues” demonstrates the latest trends of Western glamour: “broad-shouldered” jackets, decorated by rhinestones, oversized jackets, silk blouses, mini-skirts, leggings, “boiled” jeans, massive gilded jewelry, lace gloves, fishnet tights. Clothing in this cinema not only performs a decorative role but also clearly indicates the social status of the characters. This is emphasized by the parting gift for the mother of the main character: Arctic Fox fur coat, which costs “a lot of money”. Mother, touched and frightened by this luxury, can’t believe it and say: “You are crazy, you are just crazy”.

A different view of fashion is demonstrated by Vasili Pichul’s film “Little Vera” (1988). The style of that time is shown through the prism of “social bottom”: the main character spends most of the screen time in a simple t-shirt and a black mini-skirt but highlighted combed hair, large plastic earrings and bracelets made the image iconic. The “Little Vera” was perceived abroad as a symbol of perestroika and glasnost.

Vasili Pichul’s film “Little Vera” (1988)

The analysis of the costumes in most popular and style-revealing films of the perestroika period shows that at the peak of the outdated Soviet art modeling, which was accompanied by a “gray” commercial assortment, a total deficit and speculation, there were different directions of fashion alternatives: rebellious fashion of subcultures, little groups or individuals, compromise “poor” adaptation of fashion, corresponding to the economic crisis, and glamorous “Western fashion”, desired by the majority, but available to the elite only. All three directions were positively perceived by young people and sharply condemned by those who lived in the system of outdated Soviet values. Since perestroika fashion entered global trends in the early 2020s, Soviet films of that time can serve as a source not only of fashion history studying but also as a source of inspiration for modern and future fashion designers.

References

  1. Караева К. З. Изобразительные особенности соц-арта во взаимодействии с визуальным языком отечественного кинематографа 1970-2000-х годов: диссертация кандидата искусствоведения: 17.00.03 / Караева Карина Зауровна; [Место защиты: Всерос. гос. ин-т кинематографии им. С.А. Герасимова]. – Москва, 2017. – 160 с.
  2. Ятина Л. И., Калинина Т. С. Изображение стиля жизни молодёжи в российском кинематографе: трансформация практик в обществе потребления // Журнал социологии и социальной антропологи, 2011, Т.XIV, № 5. – С. 168–181.
  3. Gronow J., Zhuravlev S. Fashion Meets Socialism: Fashion Industry in the Soviet Union after the Second World War / Jukka Gronow and Sergey Zhuravlev. – Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society, 2015. – 303 pp.
  4. Ruptures and Continuities in Soviet/Russian Cinema: Styles, characters and genres before and after the collapse of the USSR (Routledge Contemporary Russia and Eastern Europe Series) 1st Edition / by Birgit Beumers (Editor), Eugenie Zvonkine (Editor). – London: Routledge, 2019 – 226 pp.

Text © Myroslav Melnyk, 2020. This is thesis for Nefiltravanae Kino: Proceeding of the film studies conference (Minsk, March 13, 2020).

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Cecil Beaton's sketches

Cecil Beaton

Although best known as a photographer, Cecil Beaton also worked as an illustrator and designer for stage and film. He designs for My Fair Lady (1956), and Gigi (1958), and wins three Oscars for costume and art direction.

Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton
Cecil Beaton

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Costumes in Fellini’s Satyricon

FELLINI’S SATYRICON

The most remarkable aspects of the Fellini’s film “Satyrycon” are the costumes by renowned designer Danilo Donati. These glorious constructions are astonishing in their intricate, picturesque design. 

FELLINI’S SATYRICON
Capucine in Satyricon Fellini, 1969

Fellini had asked fashion models to act in his films. In particular, in Satyricon (Fellini – Satyricon) (1969), Donyale Luna and Capucine
play the parts of Oenothea and Tryhaena, the wife of Trimalchio. Capucine, besides starring in some films in France, was a well-known model who worked for Christian Dior, Hubert de Givenchy and Pierre Balmain. The dress worn by Capucine in Satyricon, an example of how costume and fashion are interrelated and now held in the archives of the sartoria Farani in Rome, is a masterpiece in its nuances of pale blue and its hundreds of pleats à la Fortuny (the Delphos gown) .

Delfos by Mariano Fortuni

In the scenes in which Capucine wears this costume, along with the
appropriate visual effects and make-up, the film takes the form of a very
sophisticated fashion photo shoot. The body of the model performs the
spectacle of the timeless quality of the dress. Costume here becomes
fashion, while at the same time transcending it. In this historical adaptation, the geniality of costume designer Danilo Donati comes to the fore.


Satyricon was the first collaboration between Fellini and Donati, who went on to work with him on several films such as I Clowns, Roma, Amarcord, Casanova, Ginger and Fred, Intervista (Tosi Pamphili 2014: 16). As a costume designer and art director, Donati was eclectic, but he could never be called a philologist of costume adaptation. Rather, his aim was to reinvent historical dress, reframe history and costume through the contemporary eyes and with a poetry that was relevant for the character and the story in question. Gianfranco Angelucci commenting on Donati’s work states that he was interested more in the interior landscape of an epoch than its reconstruction (2014: 54). Donati even affirmed that ‘Il vero è l’amico degli amanti della filologia che come si sa è la morte della creatività’: truth is friend with lovers of historical accuracy, which, as we know, is the death of creativity (Angelucci 2014: 66).

Truth is friend with lovers of historical accuracy, which, as we know, is the death of creativity.


But how does this act of reframing history through dress and costume
work? [Eugenia Paulicelli Reframing history: Federico Fellini’s Rome, fashion and costume // Film, Fashion & Consumption 2019, Volume 8, Number 1].

FELLINI’S SATYRICON
FELLINI’S SATYRICON
FELLINI’S SATYRICON

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Swarovski Renaissance costumes

Swarovski Book of Dreams (2018) shows Swarovski crystals in the context of Renaissance costume. It was an inspiring partnership between Creative Director Giovanna and Martina Mondadori Sartogo of Cabana Magazine and Swarovski Professional. Photography – Clara Giaminardi, fashion Editor/Stylist – Elisabeth Zaccanti & Giovanna Battaglia, models – Greta Varlese & Lorna Foran.

Swarovski Book of Dreams (2018)
Swarovski Book of Dreams (2018)
Swarovski Book of Dreams (2018)
Swarovski Book of Dreams (2018)
Swarovski Book of Dreams (2018)

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Swarovski Book of Dreams (2018)

Vytynanka by Craig Green

Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection

Since the invention of paper in China in the 1st century BCE, paper cut-outs have been utilized by a long line of craftsmen, folk artists, and fine artists.  In Ukraine artistic cut-outs calles “Vytynanka” (from the Ukrainian word “витинати” – “to cut out”). It is a kind of ancient, in particular Ukrainian and Polish (wycinanki), folk decorative art. Traditionally it includes ornamental decorations, silhouettes, scenes etc.

Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection

Vytynankas are made using scissors, special small knife cutters, passed from generation to generation, as well as knives, axes, and other implements. The most usual materiall for Vytynanka is paper (white or colored).

Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection

Usually Vytynankas are used to decorate the premises – walls, windows, as well as shelves, fireplaces, stoves in everyday life, as well as for the preparation of religious or secular holidays.

Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection
Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection
Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection
Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection
Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection

The Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection had eight beautifull men’s costumes, made in cutting-out technique: white and seven rainbow colors .

Craig Green’s SPRING/SUMMER 2020 MENSWEAR collection

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Discovering: Victoire Laffineur


Designer Victoire Laffineur

French designer Victoire Laffineur did her BA Fashion Design in Esmod (2017). After that, she was interning at Haider Ackermann in Collection Development and Pattern departments until March 2018.

She had one month exhibition in a textile Museum called La Manufacture in Roubaix on September/October 2017.

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Discovery: Katarzyna Konieczka

Costume design Katarzyna Konieczka

Born in Gdansk (Poland) Avant-garde fashion designer.
Graduated artistic education in The International School of Costume and Fashion Design

Finalist in Golden Thread competition premiere vision category (2009)
Diane Pernet AVOF award 2009 (Premiere Vision category)
Robb Young Premiere Vision choise 2009 ( Vogue.co.uk, International Herald Tribune, the Financial Times, FT’s The Business of Fashion)
Re-Act Fashion Show (2009) Third award (Fashion Week Poland ecological competition)
OFF Fashion competition (2009) Third award
Most photogenic collection award (2009) in OFF Fashion Kielce contest
First distinction in TIMEX contest: “Inspiration Time” 2010
OFF Fashion contest finalist (2010)

Costume design Katarzyna Konieczka

Costume design Katarzyna Konieczka

Costume design Katarzyna Konieczka

Costume design Katarzyna Konieczka

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Guda Koster

Guda Koster

Guda Koster is a Dutch artist who creates living sculptures and performances, which the photographs are the results of. Koster’s works are created in parallels of time, space and textile.In her works Koster uses fabrics, colours and patterns that underline the codes and meanings our clothing conveys.

Guda Koster

The identity of the models with covered faces encrypts their relation to the environment — their costumes have either matched or contrasted with the surrounding with the interior in a series of colorful works. Pictures of Guda Koster are full of irony and mild criticism of the mystery that makes the viewer want to know more.

Guda Koster

Guda Koster

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Sincerely Yours

Myroslav Melnyk )